The Seven Generations of Bonding Agents

Good things come to those who wait. At least that’s true of many dentistry tools, procedures, and technologies. We live in a time of relative ease, having readily available solutions to any number of dental issues. But many of the techniques, tools, and materials we use today didn’t just appear on their own. They’re the result of decades, sometimes centuries, of progress.

 The History of Bonding

As for bonding agents, the most exciting updates started developing between the 1960s and 1980s in what is generally referred to as the 1st and 2nd generation of bonding. The first bonding materials were developed without dentin etching and were therefore weak. From the 1980s to the late 90s, bonding had evolved three generations over, and by the 5th generation, primer and adhesive were combined for the first time. In the 6th and 7th generations of bonding, the bond strengths became more dependable. The current, 7th generation of bonding has an easy-to-use application, combined etch primer and bonding agent but has a lowered strength. Although bonding agents continue to evolve, there are still some who prefer to use 5th and 6th generation bonding agents, and indeed, some situations where the older generations are more appropriate.

What are Universal Bonding Agents?

● Examples: Futurabond U & All-Bond Universal

● The definition of “universal” depends on the manufacturer

● Generally, it can be used for more than one type of procedure

● Can be used with several types of curing resin

So Many Choices

Dentistry Today suggests first looking at how the bonding agents “adhere to all the substrates, dentin, cut and uncut enamel.” Another factor to consider is how each bonding agent is packaged and prepared. In the end, it’s the dentist’s discretion. Ultimately, dentists will choose whichever bonding agent they feel works best for their procedure, but no matter which generation of bonding agent is more appropriate, whether it’s the traditional 5th or the new 7th, it’s always important to carefully read every label.

For all your bonding needs, be sure to check out Dental Brands.

Dental Brands: 1-888-441-0443

Source: http://www.dentistrytoday.com/dental-materials/10036-bonding-agents-so-many-choices